getting the blues, as well as the oranges, pinks, and purples

I think one thing dyers generally go through is the constant tweaking of their process. Kind of like chefs thinking “I wonder if adding a little whiskey to these chocolate chip cookies would be an improvement,” I’m constantly wondering what changes I should be making to make my process better/faster/have prettier results. I’ve been doing basic low water immersion for several years now with notebooks full of notes, and yet I keep updating my base worksheet.

My latest tweak has to do with the volume of dye solution I’m using. This is not only related to the type and amount of silk I’m dyeing, but also to the container I’m packing it in. I used to use containers that were a little flatter and wider than what I have now, so I’m puzzling over what the ideal amount of liquid by volume is to pour over the fabric. 32 ounces is a bit much, but 24 ounces is not quite enough. And in an ideal world it would be nice if the final number were easily divisible by 2, 3, or 4, depending on how many colors I want to add! Well, if it were easy, everybody would be doing it, I guess.

http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=ago09-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=0955164915&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrI just got my copy of Tray Dyeing in the mail the other day. Have barely had a chance to look at it. I’m very curious to see how the authors processes are similar or different than my own. But no matter how much process you stick on top of low water immersion dyeing, there’s always a wonderful randomness to it. You aren’t painting… you are doing the opposite of painting, sort of setting the pigment free to do what it wants to do. I always love the surprise!

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